CORRESPONDENCE.

APPARATUS FOR THE NEW GYMNASIUM.

TO THE EDITORS OF THE CRIMSON:-

I HAVE been informed by persons, who should be authority on the subject, that a large portion of the apparatus in the old gymnasium is to be utilized in furnishing our new one. If this is a fact (and I have no reason to think otherwise) I desire to make an emphatic objection, and I am confident that all who are at all interested in athletics will join with me in opposing this project. If, however, I have been misinformed, as I hope I have been, it will possibly be of no harm to direct the attention of the "powers that be" to the necessity of furnishing our new gymnasium with the best and most improved modern apparatus.

It is a well-known fact that the apparatus in our old gymnasium is not what it should be, not what we should expect to find in a well-regulated gymnasium, and the idea of again making use of these old-fashioned fixings is absurd. We want better, and if better is not given us we may as well continue to use our old gymnasium with all its inconveniences.

In regard to new apparatus, General Lister knows, or should know, of the many improvements which have been made in gymnasium equipments of late years; and if he, in co-operation with the students, will cast his influence in the right direction, I trust he can accomplish that which we most need, - and indeed must have, - good apparatus.

H.CLASS DAY SPREADS.TO THE EDITORS OF THE CRIMSON:-

IF the College papers are a means of correcting wrongs and calling attention to abuses, I wish that they would unite in using their influence upon certain under-class men who seem to have forgotten that the day called in the catalogue Seniors' Class Day is not exclusively for them. I know that it requires some generosity to give up a desirable room to persons who may be almost strangers, but it also requires much selfishness to refuse to do so. As a last act of courtesy to the graduating class, as an effort to preserve the pleasant features of a time-honored festival, and as a means of justifying the request for a similar favor in a later year, it seems fitting that under-class men should surrender their rooms for the day to Seniors. Most men have willingly done so, but there are a few notable exceptions; and these I hope the College papers will not fail to notice.

'79.