TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.

FROM THE BOSTON HERALD.

Hanlan sails for New York today from England.

Nearly 7000 immigrants landed at New York yesterday.

A statue of Reuben Springer was unveiled at Cincinnati yesterday.

A new scheme for Arctic exploration has been proposed to Congress.

The Senate yesterday confirmed Worthington's nomination by a vote of 38 to 14.

There is little doubt but that Judge Cox's rulings in the Guiteau case will be affirmed.

A party of twelve persons were drowned near Chicago yesterday by the capsizing of a sailing boat.

The town of Danville, near Montreal, was visited by a fire yesterday which destroyed $250,000 worth of property.

The report that one of the Chinese students at Yale, who was recently called home, was afterwards beheaded, is pronounced false.

The English detectives have discovered the car in which were driven the Irish assassins, and from this they have hopes of finding the driver.

Miss Emilie Leste, of Montreal, has sued Alphonso Keroack, the wealthy manufacturer, for breach of promise, with damages set at $50,000.

Games yesterday: At Providence, Bostons 2, Providence 9; at Worcester, Troys 1, Worcesters 5; at Chicago, Clevelands 4, Chicagos 10; at Detroit, Buffalos 1, Detroits 8.

The Senate committee on civil service reform is now considering Mr. Pendleton's bill prohibiting political assessments, and the joint resolution proposing an amendment to the constitution providing for the election of minor federal officers by the people.

It is stated that the Porte has sent a circular to the powers, protesting against the dispatch of foreign men-of-war to Egypt as unjustifiable, and declaring, moreover, that, were such action necessary, it would devolve upon the Sultan as sovereign of Egypt.

Word has been received from London by Richard K. Fox that Tug Wilson will start for America the latter part of this month to make the proposed match with John L. Sullivan, the champion pugilist, for the championship of the world. The stakes will be $2500 a side.

This morning the ways and means committee will take up Mr. Gibson's sugar bill, providing for the use of the polariscope in appraising duty on sugar. The committee will refer it to the Secretary of the Treasury, who will be asked to state whether the polariscope will aid in preventing frauds on the government.

A Washington evening paper says: The following is understood to be the catechism of civil service examination under this administration: (1.) Were you connected with the New York Custom House under Chester Arthur? (2.) If not, was your father connected? (3.) Were you bounced by Hayes? (4.) Were you agin Jim Blaine?

THE WEATHER.WASHINGTON, D. C., May 16, 1882 - 1 A. M. For New England, fair weather; northerly winds, becoming variable; stationary temperature; higher pressure.