NOTES AND COMMENTS.

It has been decided at Oxford University that the dues payable by members during their first four years of life there be increased. The cause of this is certain unremunerative expenditures that have been made, the benefit of which accrues almost wholly to undergraduates. Among these are the Taylorian Galleries; the parks (pound38,800); the museum (pound15,000, all of which, except the cost of the site, has been paid out of income); an observatory (pound7,500); a new chemical laboratory (pound7,500); the restoration of the Bodleian edifice (pound20,000); the new schools site (pound38,000), and the new schools building (pound103,000), or a total of pound208,000, of which more than one-half was unremunerative expenditure. So far from there being no means of reducing expenditures, there is rather an obligation to increase them, and all this while the loss from agricultural depression is great and the future clouded with uncertainty. The proposition was that the payments of the undergraduates be raised from pound1 per annum to pound2, the master of Balliol remarking that what the undergraduates had gained was not to be measured by pound1 or pound5 or pound10. It was adopted in congregation by a vote of 25 to 20.

The Dartmouth curriculum has just been thoroughly revised, and as now arranged is thus described: The course of study to be pursued by candidates for the degree of bachelor of arts is made up of prescribed and elective studies, in addition to which certain optional studies are provided for in senior year. Latin-scientific students, or candidates for the degree of bachelor of letters, pursue the same studies, except in the prescribed courses in Greek, in place of which they pursue certain courses specified in the accompanying schemes. In freshman, sophomore and junior years, attendance is required at fifteen exercises a week; in freshman and sophomore years, all these exercises consist of prescribed studies; in junior year, certain of them are elective. In senior year, eleven exercises a week are required, in part prescribed and in part elective; opportunity is afforded to pursue, also, a number of optional studies. The above requirements do not include the weekly rhetorical and the Sunday Biblical exercises; nor certain lectures specified later, given in junior year.