THE LACROSSE TOURNAMENT.

Last Saturday a little after 11 o'clock Yale began to play the New York University team, and at noon the game stopped in favor of Yale with a score of 2 goals to 0. This was not a hard earned victory, considering the almost total inability of the New York's to pick up the ball, and the terrorizing recklessness with which the Yale men brandished their sticks. At 12 the Druids, of Baltimore, and Harvard faced one another. If, at first, there was any doubt in the minds of the Harvard men as to the ability of their opponents to play lacrosse, it was soon dispelled by the ease and certainty with which the Druids managed the ball. They were sure in picking up the ball, good in throwing it, and above all could dodge and run well. Harvard's game has always been a passing and not a running game ; but when the Druids showed that they could do both equally well, it was evident that Harvard had met more than her match. In less than fifteen minutes the Druids secured their first goal, and not long after scored a second. These two goals were probably due to the fact that not only Harvard's defense, but also several of her fielders rushed in to help defend the goal, thus Easton had no chance to defend his goal because he could not see the ball in the dense crowd. Several times Harvard threatened the Druids' goal, but without success, until Noyes got a clear throw at about 30 feet from goal ; the ball was partially stopped by a Druid's stick, but as it bounded off was quickly batted through by Woods. There was now about fifteen minutes left, and the team played its best, but partly by luck and partly by the excellent dodging of the best prayer of the Druids two more goals were made against Harvard. Score, 4-1.

Next, the New York Amateur Lacrosse Club beat Princeton by a score of 3-0, the same score that Harvard made against Princeton last May on Jarvis field. The Princeton defense played an excellent game and could not expect to do better against the team, predestined to be winner.

At 2 o'clock the best game of the day was played between the New York Amateur and the Druids. For sometime the two teams seemed evenly matched, but the rough playing of the New York's together with the fine work of Flannery and Journey secured their first goal, and the continued fine play of the New York's secured them the game. Score, 3-1.

The last game began at 3, between New York Amateur and Yale, who had won the bye and thus had been resting for three hours, whereas the New York's had been playing hard for two hours. By plucky and scientific work the New York's outplayed the fresh Yale team. The experienced and fine play of New York more than counterbalanced their fatigue and they won the game by a score of 2-1, thereby securing the Oelrich cup.