FACT AND RUMOR.

Photograph groups today at 2 P. M. Editors Crimson. Tomorrow (Thursday), at 2 P. M., Zeta Psi. Saturday, 12 M., Glee Club.

The 'Varsity did not row yesterday.

The plank walks have disappeared from the yard.

Important meeting of Institute of 1770 this evening at 7.30.

Amherst expresses growing confidence in the prospects of her nine.

A regular meeting of the overseers of the college occurs in Boston this morning at 11.

Today is the last day of receiving names of competitors for the Boylston prizes.

Professor Palmer will read the 10th book of Homer's "Odyssey" in Sever 11 this evening at 7.30.

Smith College has grown so rapidly during the past year that two new dormitories are necessitated.

The New York colleges are trying to get the use of a field in Central Park, on which to play lacrosse.

It is rumored that Prof. Palmer will take a vacation next year, and that Dr. Royce will take his place.

A quartette from the Glee Club will sing between the acts at the Pi Eta theatricals tomorrow evening.

Professor White will use the lantern today at 12 o'clock, in illustrating the last three lectures of Greek XI.

Private individuals in the United States have given $70,000,000 to the cause of education during the past twelve years.

Tickets for the Pi Eta theatricals may be obtained of L. E. Sexton, No. 1 Holyoke street, from 11 to 12 A. M. and from 3 to 5 P. M. They are also on sale at Oliver Ditson's, Washington street, Boston, and at Bartlett's drug store, Cambridge. The prices of the tickets are $1.50 and $1.00.

The elections for president and vice-president of the Memorial Hall Dining Association will be held this evening, and those for directors tomorrow.

Miss Harris requests all students who began the year with extra studies and have given them up or wish to do so, to give notice to that effect at the office, U. 5, as soon as possible.

The new Ireland Professor of Exegesis has begun by laying the university under a great obligation. He has undertaken to compress his introductory remarks into two lectures, instead of three, as at first advertised. Would our gratitude be greater or less if he followed the example of some previous professors, and abstained from lecturing at all? - [Oxford Magazine.

Mr. H. C. Bierwirth read his Bowdoin prize essay on "The Doctrine and Method of Socrates," in Sever 11 last evening to a very appreciative audience. On account of the length of the essay he was compelled to omit portions and was unable to dwell much on the personal characteristics of Socrates. The essay dealt mainly with the philosophy of Socrates and his school, and was very critical and interesting throughout.