Fact and Rumor.

The next Advocate will appear on Jan. 7.

The Technique, the Tech. annual, appears on Tuesday.

There were cuts in all Dr. Hart's courses on Saturday.

The last number of the CRIMSON for this year will be issued to-morrow.

The Shooting Club expects to purchase its grounds near Watertown.

The newly elected editors of the Lampoon are H. Lyman, '86; F. T. Cooper, '86; and Noble, '88.

A toboggan club, organized in Brookline, proposes to have a slide on Wright's Hill.

The new catalogue of Bowdoin College shows an attendance of 186 students, of whom 67 are in the medical school.

Dr. Hart has left Cambridge for his Christmas vacation. The lecture in History XIII on Tuesday will not be given.

The new gymnasium of the University of Pennsylvania, recently opened, is one of the most completely fitted up buildings of the kind in the country.

Mr. J. Malcolm Forbes has just bought the famous Puritan from Mr. Paine her present owner. Gen. Paine is having a new 85 foot sloop designed for him by Mr. Burgess.

At a meeting of the Handel society of Dartmouth College, the time for initiating freshmen was changed to the winter term. A prize of $25 was offered for the best song composed before the next commencement, to be known distinctively as the college song.

The committee which offered a prize for the best distinctive Princeton song, has announced that none of those sent in are of sufficient merit to warrant an awarding of a prize. The prize therefore is again open to competition till March, 1886.

At a meeting of the Northern League, Holden was debarred from playing next year. The rule passed was, "that no player belonging to two colleges shall be allowed to play" and "that Holden is debarred from playing in the northern league in the future."

A test-case in the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, as to whether a Yale student had the right to become an elector of New Haven, has just been decided in the negative. The ground for the decision was that he did not intend to make the town his home.

At the Technology winter sports on Saturday, the winners were as follows: fence vault, Dearborn, '88, 6 ft. 8 in.; shot, Fletcher, '87, 34 ft.; high kick, Sturges, '87, 8 ft. 6 in.; running high jump, Devens, '88, 5 ft. 2 3-4 in.; standing high jump, Young, '86, 4 ft. 8 in. The tug-of-war was won by '87 over '86 and '88.

The class of '86 at Columbia are raising $100,000 to build a new gymnasium as a memorial to the class. It is proposed to build a gymnasium 75x100 feet in size, two stories high, of brick with stone trimmings, and a gable roof supported by arches. On the first floor it is proposed to have the bath, dressing, rowing and trophy rooms, and on the second floor the gymnasium proper, with a gallery for an exercise track.

Myers' retirement (if such is the case) will leave a huge gap in American athletics that will be a long time healing up, while such men as Baker and Goodwin are objects of pride and admiration to their countrymen, still the fact that they confine their powers almost entirely to college games and seldom enter open amateur competitions, detracts considerably from their importance as representatives of athletics in this country. * * * What a splendid list of high jumpers we have now. Page, little, wiry, cat-like Page, hit the record such a crack this year as to send it up to 6.00 1-4. * * * Then Reinhart stands at 5.10 1-4; Atkinson, 5.9 3-4; Richards, 5-9 1-4; Whitehorn, 5.8 1-4, etc. If Reinhart really settled down to business and stopped smoking, he could beat the record: that I am sure of. - G. D. Baird in Cyclist and Athlete.