Fact and Rumor.

A bequest of $35,000 has been recently made to Wellesley.

Princeton has passed a set of resolutions of the death of Watkinson.

All theses on "Butler" in Philosophy 4 must be handed in by Wednesday.

Cornell has subscribed $1,000 to the general athletic fund since September.

The students at Exeter who live in the West have engaged a special car as far as Chicago.

A poster at Bartlett's announced that the Brookline toboggan slide was open last night.

Calendars with pretty prints of "How It Happened" have been circulated by the Mutual Life Insurance Company.

A new matting has been laid in Memorial Hall, to the joy of many who for the past few weeks have tripped in the holes of the old matting.

The senior class of Exeter has elected its senior class-day officers. The president of the day is J. C. F. Huntington of New York.

At Yale a prize of $30 has been offered to the senior who hands in the best essay in German on Victor von Scheffel, his life and works.

"The new Requisitions for admission at Harvard College," is the title of an interesting article by Mr. W. Dawson, in the Popular Science Monthly.

Mr. James Robinson has been secured as athletic trainer by Princeton. The Princetonian considers him to be the most successful trainer in his specialty in the United States. Ferguson, the crack pitcher of the Philadelphias, will coach the nine during the winter.

The average attendance at daily morning chapel was 195 during the pastorate of Rev. Phillips Brooks, and 175 during that of Rev. Geo. Gordon up to to day. That so slight a decrease should be shown in this number during the month of most absorbing outside interests and blustering weather, is one of the greatest proofs of the wisdom of providing that such attendance be voluntary.

The Harvard freshmen seem unaccountably shy about letting the Yale freshmen in their New London race. It is all the difference they perceive between an almost sure victory rowed against Columbia alone, and a doubtful victory with Yale in the race. The excuse alleged that the New London course is not adapted for three crews is a humbug. At any rate they will probably take no action until it is possible to see what kind of crew the Yale freshmen will have. - New York World.

But you're wrong in your logic, good Dr. McCosh!

By fallacious confusion you mistook the allusion,

And you'll find that your X's, if that's what perplexes,

Are only - not Y's; and when old Harvard tries

To make proper amends, take her hand and be friends!

While from Princeton and Harvard one great cheer ascends

For both Doctors - Holmes and McCosh - b'gosh! - Boston Herald.

Henry C. Kingsley, for the past quarter of a century treasurer of Yale University, died Sunday morning aged aged 71 years. Mr. Kingsley was a native of New Haven, studied at the Hopkin's grammar school, was graduated from Yale in 1834 and from the Law School in 1837. He was admitted to the bar and became a partner with his brother, G. T. Kingsley, in Cleaveland. In 1852 he retired from the law firm, and became a director in the Pittsburg & Cleveland railroad. In 1862 he was elected treasurer of Yale, which position he he held until his death. He was a son of Prof. J. L. Kingsley.