Note and Comment.

THE NEW COLUMBIA GYMNASIUM.

"The building contains for the exclusive use of collegians a gymnasium, a rowing room, a base-ball cage, a swimming bath, bowling alleys and other rooms. It also contains a large lecture room, which may be completely isolated from the rest of the building, so that it could be leased for public uses. The heights of the stories are as follows: Basement, 12 feet; first story, 12 feet; second story, 10 feet; and third story, 22 feet. Columns being objectionable, they are avoided by the use of trusses.

The first story front is divided into three parts, the entrance to the lecture room being in the centre. On the right are the lobby, ticket office, coat room, etc., and on the left the entrance for collegians, coat room, smoking room, etc. The entire rear is taken up by the lecture room. This hall will seat 600, and has a stage or raised platform. The floor has a gradual slope to the stage.

The second story in front is taken up by the billiard and rowing rooms, the former on the right and the latter on the left of the central hall. On the left hand side of the rear wing of this story is the locker room, containing 600 standing lockers. On the right hand side, commencing at the rear, are the dressing room, drying room, wash room and lavatory, communicating with each other in the order named. The billiard room has space for four tables. The rowing room is fifty-two feet long and nine feet wide. The wash room contains six shower baths and two needle showers, in addition to all conveniences necessary for a well-appointed room of the kind.

The third story is taken up by the gymnasium. Two small rooms in the front of this floor are to be used for a boxing and fencing room and a room for the director of athletics. The gymnasium proper occupies the remainder of the floor, and covers a space fifty-six by ninety-seven feet. The room is spanned by trusses, which serve, in addition to carrying the roof, to support the gymnastic apparatus, such as ladders, trapezes, rings, etc., besides the running track, which is suspended from them, and is twenty laps to the mile. The small rooms on this floor have ceilings level with the bottom of the running track, the space above being used to form belvideres or loggias, which are open to the outer air on the street, and on the court through colonnades. Each measures twenty by twenty-eight feet, and they are intended to be used as out-door rooms or piazzas, in warm weather. The floors of these piazzas are on a level with the running track. There will be a gallery for the use of spectators.

The basement in front is taken up by the swimming bath on the right and a hall and lavatory on the left. The swimming bath, eighteen by fifty feet, is lined with enamelled brick. It has a lavatory extending out under the sidewalk. Under the right hand court is the base-ball cage, which is well lighted by windows and skylights. The left hand side is occupied by four bowling alleys in the rear. On the right is a private stairway for the use of men in exercising dress.

The building itself is T shaped, the head of the T forming the front on the street. The leg of the T runs back to the rear of the building line, leaving on each side an open space or court twenty feet wide. This shape, giving as it does

two comparatively narrow masses of buildings at right angles to each other, is the most favorable for obtaining abundance of light and air in all parts of the building." - N, Y, Post.