Communication.

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To the Editors of the Crimson:

Permit me to call attention to a matter which although seemingly outside the immediate circle of college interests, yet concerns the college as a part of the community, and which should appeal strongly to Harvard men-namely, the report and suggestions of the Board of Metropolitan Park Commissioners.

It is now in the power of the citizens of the "Greater Boston" of which Cambridge forms a part, to secure at a comparatively trifling cost a system of great natural parks, which as the community grows will prove a priceless boon to the people-a perpetual source of recreation and health.

The reservation of the banks of the Charles is the part of the plan that appeals most directly to us. But the prospect of glowing encroachment upon the wonderfully beautiful natural reservations of the Blue Hill Range and of the Middlesex Fells, calls for more immediate action. The first desire of the Commissioners, therefore, is that the General Court take immediate steps to save as a perpetual heritage to the people, these two reservation, so accessible, so abounding in the natural beauties of mountain, forest, waterfall and lake, so rich in historic relations, that they would give Boston a park system unique among the cities of the world.

A petition addressed to the General Court and calling for appropriate action has been prepared by the Appalachian Mountain Club, and may be signed at Memorial Hall, Sever Hall, Massachusetts Hall, or the Foxcroft Club.

There can be no question as to the wisdom of the policy proposed. There can be no doubt as to its adoption when once the inertia of the public has been overcome: Intelligent people ought to see to it that this inertia does not prevent the prompt action necessary to secure this great boon at slight cost. Is it not a case in which Harvard men may fittingly express by their cooperation with the Commission-headed as it is by an honored graduate and benefactor of the University-their intelligent interest in the welfare of the community?

C.