The Bussey Institution.

The Bussey Institution, although an important part of the University, is all too little known to Harvard undergraduates. It is the agricultural and horticultural school founded by Benjamin Bussey for the purpose of giving instruction to young men who intend to become farmers, gardeners, florists or landscape gardeners.

It is situated in Jamaica Plam, about five miles southwest of Boston. The farm connected with the school is given chiefly to the production of hay, which is consumed on the farm by the horses and cattle taken to board.

The regular course given this year are: Agriculture, Mr. Hersey; horticulture, Mr. Watson; aboriculture, Mr. Watson: agricultural chemistry, Professor Storer; and a course in qualitative analysis by Professor Storer. This last course is introduced this year. Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, and practical exercises in the laboratories, green-houses, and fields. During the year excursions are made in the neighboring country for observing the best methods of cultivating and maintaining farms and dairies; and for the study of domestic animals.

The number of students is 12, the same as at this time last year. During the year this number will probably be considerably increased. Two men took the degree of Bachelor of Agricultural Science last year and three will receive it this year.

The State Bacteriological Department has recently placed an experiment station at the Bussey institution. The work done is chiefly on horses and guineapigs for the production and testing of antitoxin.