THE OBSERVATORY.

Work Accomplished by Harvard Astronomical Station.

Although most of the work done at the Harvard Observatory is, of necessity, in cooperation with other observatories and meteorological stations, yet the remarkable activity which characterizes its independent work, is shown not only in its observations but also by its publications, which are numerous and extensive, covering a great variety of subjects.

Meteorological observations are maintained in connection with the Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory, while in cooperation with the New England Weather Service observations are made at about two hundred stations distributed over New England and the results are published in the Annals. The preparation of these Annals, which con-contain the results of observations, occupies a large part of the assistant force, which numbers about forty.

Much of the work is of photographic nature and this together with the observations keep many of the instruments in constant use, among which are the eleven-inch Draper photographic telescope, the fourteen-inch and six-inch equatorial telescopes, the eight-inch transit circle and the Bruce photographic telescope. The Harvard Observatory and the Kiel Obse. votary have been selected by astronomers as centres for the prompt announcement of astronomical discoveries.

The advantages of the station at Arequipa, Peru, have been so pronounced that it will be maintained permanently, and the Bruce photographic telescope, the latest acquisition to the equipment of the observatory, will be sent there in the near future. This instrument has proved very successful in photographing stars too faint to be photographed by other instruments and thus enabling them to be studied.

The library of the observatory is one of the best in the country and contains about 8000 volumes and 10,000 pamphlets.

Instruction in astronomy is not given at the observatory but facilities are offered to astronomers and special students in astronomy for using the library and instruments, so far as this can be done without interfering with the regular work.