The Elective Pamphlet.

As is usually the case the elective pamphlet shows a great many changes over previous years. The principal changes in the different courses are given below.

In Semitic languages and history Professor Toy returns to take up his old courses. He and Professor Lyon will divide between each other the courses given by Professor Moore and Dr. Chester this year. The only change in the courses is that course 16 has been reduced to a half course which will run through the first half year.

All the courses in Indo-Iranian languages will be given next year by Professor Lanman, who takes in addition to his own courses those which were conducted this year by Mr. More.

The courses, as well as the instructors in Classical Philology have been considerably changed. Greek D, 16, 9, 4, 12, and the Seminary courses 34, 33, 30, 39, 35 are not in the list for the coming year. The new courses which are to be given next year are:

Latin 9, a half course in the practice in Latin expression and style, by Professor Greenough.

Seminary courses in classical philology:

31, a half course in the elements of Oscan and Umbrian by Professor Allen.

42, Introduction to the Critical Study of Homer by Professor Allen.

23, The Tragedies of Aeschylus by Professor Goodwin.

41, a half course on Cicero's Correspondence, by Professor Smith.

40, a half course on the Physical Theories of the Stoics, by Mr. Parker.

In English two new courses have been added.

30, a course in forensics and debating will be counted as an equivalent of English C and a half course of elective study. The course will be conducted by Assistant Professor Baker and Mr. Hayes.

29, a half course on the English novel, from Richardson to George Eliot, will be given by Professor Hill.

17, a half course has been changed in its character. It was formerly Mr. Baker's course on the English literature of the Elizabethan period. Next year it will be a course on the English literature of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in relation to Italian and Spanish literature of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

20b, a new course on the English literature in its relation to Italian literature in the sixteenth century will be conducted by Mr. Fletcher, but will not be given until 1896-97, alternating with 20a.