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On Thursday afternoon those seniors who are entitled to Commencement Parts are expected to meet Professor Hill for the purpose of conferring with him either upon the subjects or the matter of the parts they have chosen to prepare.

We hope that no member of the class of Ninety-six needs to be urged to take the opportunity of trying for a Commencement Part. It is a service that the class expects from those of its members who are qualified by their record to undertake it. Even if men do not fully appreciate the personal advantage and honor that is to be gained in taking part in the Commencement exercises of the University, they must certainly feel that they are under a strong obligation to their fellows, who are looking to them to uphold the honor of their class in the eyes of the outside world. Others have struggled for and achieved victory in different fields. Ninety-six will leave the College with a good record in athletic sports. Its crew has won the championship; its baseball and football teams have been very successful and have not lowered their colors to Yale; and its debaters and speakers have won deserving praise. Yet the College expects something beyond this from its senior class, something better and more lasting than all the other victories put together. It looks for a record in scholarship that will equal the achievements of the class in other directions.

The duty of maintaining the honor of Ninety-six in scholarship rests with the students who are entitled to Commencement Parts, for these men are the scholars of the class. There should be no hesitation among the men to whom the privilege of competing for a part has been given. Their duty should be a pleasure, and not only the class but the whole University has a right to expect that they will acquit themselves with credit.

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