A MAN WORTH HEARING.

The ever recurring complaint that undergraduates are not given a chance to hear the foremost men in some of the departments of instruction in the University and thus are deprived of the great good obtainable from the inspiration of a recognized leader in his particular work has not arrived as yet, but we venture to say it is on the way and so will take time by the forelock and meet it before it comes and invert it. For those who annually sympathize with this complaint, attention is called to the lecture this afternoon by Professor James. The Department of Philosophy lost heavily last winter when he resigned, but it appears we are to have a chance to hear him further, at least for a series of eight lectures, which he delivered at Oxford last spring.

It should not be inferred, however, that the CRIMSON is entirely out of sympathy with this time-honored complaint. There have been instances where it seemed as though we were losing by not having certain of the men recognized as authorities give courses accessible to the ordinary undergraduate. This comment is more in the nature of forwarding a policy of appreciation and optimism rather than of disparagement and worry. He has had a hard lot who must be continually sermonizing on what ought to be done and what has been done that shouldn't have been done, so when the chance is offered to look on the other side it is well worth taking. A large crowd should hear Professor James today and we hope there will be a goodly number of undergraduates.