Cross-Country at Harvard and Cornell

The ill success of the Harvard cross-country team in the season just closed has prompted an inquiry into the conditions under which this sport is carried on. Accordingly the CRIMSON gives this morning a brief history of cross-country running here.

In the statements below an effort has been made to show the close relation existing between cross-country running and the distance events of the spring intercollegiate meets. Accordingly the records of Harvard and of the winning team in the intercollegiate cross-country run are given along with the records of the same teams in the intercollegiate meets of the same year.

Harvard entered a team in the intercollegiate cross-country run for the first time in 1902, when the event was held for the fourth time. In every year since then Cornell has won the cross-country run, always with a score under 30. Five of the years a Cornell runner has won the individual championship.

If now the seven years from 1902 to 1908 inclusive be considered, it appears that in the mile and two-mile runs in the intercollegiate meets of those years Cornell has taken seven places out of the 28 in the mile, and has taken 14 out of the 28 places in the two-mile.

By years these records are as follows: in 1902 Cornell's seven men in the cross-country run finished in the first 21; Cornell won third and fourth places in the mile; first and fourth places in the two-mile. Harvard had 70 cross-country candidates at the opening of the season, and finished fourth in the run. Harvard won first in the intercollegiate mile and second in the two-mile.

In 1903 Cornell won first, second, fourth, and fifth places in cross-country, and the whole team finished in the first 12. Cornell won first in the intercollegiate mile, and first, third and fourth in the two-mile. Harvard was second in the cross-country, her first man finishing seventh, but did not score in the intercollegiate distance events.

Cornell won the cross-country in 1904 with seven men in the first 21; and got first in the mile, and second and third in the two-mile. Harvard was fourth in cross-country, with no points in the two track runs.

In 1905 Cornell placed seven men in the first 20 in the cross-country; and secured second and third places in the mile, and first, second and third in the two-mile. Harvard was second in cross-country but did not score in the mile or two-mile.

The following year Cornell won second, fifth, seventh and eighth in cross-country but won only a second in the two-mile. Harvard was fifth in cross-country and failed to score in the intercollegiate mile or two-mile.

In 1907 Cornell got second and third in cross-country; first in the mile run, and first and second in the two-mile. Harvard was fifth in cross-country and did not score in the two events on the track.

In 1908 Cornell had first and fourth in cross-country, and a second place in the two-mile. Harvard was third in cross-country with a man in third place, and won a third place in the two-mile.

The average number of candidates for the cross-country team here in these years has been 42; the squad of 70 in 1902 was the largest number. In cross-country Harvard has won second place twice; third place once; fourth place twice; fifth place twice; and seventh place once. A third place in 1908 is the best record in cross-country by a Harvard runner