New Courses for Second Half-Year

The following half-courses will be offered by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for the first time during the second half-year. Several of the courses have been given during the first half-year in former academic years; these are Anthropology 8, Classical Philology 35 and 36, Comparative Literature 18, Engineering 14a, English 37, Economics 10, and Philosophy 21a. Education 6, Government 6 and 17, and History 11, which formerly have been whole courses, and Architecture 7, a half-courses, have been divided into half-courses, the second parts of which will be given during the coming half-year. Fine Arts 20 has been replaced by Fine Arts 20a, a whole course, and Fine Arts 20b, a half-course in the second half-year. Comparative Literature 31, which was a whole course last year, is now given in the first half-year as 31a, and Comparative Literature 31b is offered in the second half-year. The following three courses were formerly given as whole courses: Anthropology 4, Greek 11, and Somitic 12.

Anthropology 4.--Prehistoric European Archaeology and European Ethnography. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 12. Dr. Farabee.

Anthropology 8.--American Indian Languages. Discussion and study of selected texts. Monday, Wednesday, and (at the pleasure of the instructor) Friday, at 11. Assistant Professor Dixon.

Architecture 7b.--On Design in the Terms of Drawing and Painting. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30 to 3.30. Dr. Ross, assisted by Mr. E. O. Parker.

Astronomy 4.--The Determination of Orbits. Olber's method for parabolic orbits; Leuschner's "Short Method" for orbits of any eccentricity. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 10. Dr. Duncan.

Botany 11.--Variation, Heredity, and the Principles of Animal and Plant Breeding. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 11. Professor W. E. Castle and Assistant Professor East.

Botany 12.--Variation and Heredity. Advanced studies upon special topics. Lectures in Cambridge; laboratory work at Bussey Institution, Jamaica Plain. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, hour to be arranged. Assistant Professor East.

Business 12.--Economic Resources and Commercial Policy of the Chief European States. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 10. Mr. M. T. Copeland.

Business 14.--Economic Resources and Commercial Organization of Central and South America. Tuesday, Thursday, 4.30 to 6, and a third hour. Mr. Downs and the following lecturers: Messrs. Ignacio Colderon, G. L. Duval, T. A. Eddy, G. B. Kulenkampff, Joaquim Nabuco, C. M. Pepper, L. S. Rowe, J. L. Schaefer, W. H. Schoff, Hermann Sielcken, W. H. Stevens, R. DeC. Ward, and others.

Business 35b.--Life Insurance. Tuesday, Thursday, at 2.30-4.30. Mr. Dow.

Business 36.--Fire Insurance Engineering. Two afternoon meetings a week. Mr. Medlicott, and others.

Business 37.--Actuarial Practice. Two afternoon meetings a week. Mr. Dow.

Classical Archaeology 1b.--Etruscan and Roman Archaeology. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 11. Assistant Professor Chase.

Classical Archaeology 4. -- The Elder Pliny's Account of the History of Ancient Art (Historia Naturalis, Books XXXIV-XXXVI). Twice a week, and a third hour at the pleasure of the instructor. Assistant Professor Chase.

Classical Philology 30.--Introduction to Greek Palaeography. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 11. Professor Gulick.

Classical Philology 35.--Boethius in his relations to Ancient and to Medieval Literature and Philosophy. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 9. Professor E. K. Rand.

Classical Philology 36.--The Philippies of Demosthenes and of Cicero. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 11. Professor Morgan.

Classical Philology 51.--Roman Political Antiquities. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 9. Professor E. K. Rand.

Classical Philology 52.--The Comedies of Plautus. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 12. Professor Clifford H. Morse.

Classical Philology 58.--The Pastoral Epistles; and the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles (Didache). Twice a week, Professor Ropes.

Comparative Literature 18.--Studies in the History of Allegory. Monday, Wednesday, and (at the pleasure of the instructor) Friday, at 10. Professor Neilson.

Comparative Literature 31b.--English Literature from 1600 to the Restoration, examined in the light of its English and Continental Origins. Tuesday, Thursday, at 11. Dr. H. deW. Fuller.

Economics 10.--Medieval Economic History of Europe, Monday, Wednesday, and (at the pleasure of the instructor) Friday, at 2.30. Dr. Gray.

Economics 24.--Problems of Municipal Ownership and Control in Europe and Australia. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 9. Dr. Holcombe.

Education 6b.--Educational Theory in the Early Nineteenth Century. -- Pestalozzi, Herbart and their Followers. The Influence of Pestalozzi, Froebel, and Herbart on the Development of Modern Schools. Tuesday, Thursday, at 2.30, and a third hour at the pleasure of the instructor. Mr. Holmes.

Engineering 11a.--Steam Machinery. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 11, and one afternoon. Professor Hollis, and Messrs. Markham and Macintire.

Engineering 16b.--Illumination and Photometry. Monday at 10; laboratory, two hours a week. Professors Kennelly and Clifford.

Engineering 16e.--Alternating-Current Machinery. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 11. Professor Clifford.

Engineering 16h.--Alternating-Current Machinery. Wednesday at 8.30; laboratory work, eight hours on Wednesday, Professor Adams and Mr. Tyng.

English 37.--The Story of King Arthur, Monday, Wednesday, and (at the pleasure of the instructor) Friday, at 11. Dr. Maynadier.

Fine Arts 20b. -- Florentine Painting. Twice a week, and a third hour at the pleasure of the instructor. Mr. E. W. Forbes.

Geology 10.--Geomorphology, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 12, and additional hours for laboratory work. Assistant Professor D. W. Johnson.

Government 6b. -- History of Political Theories since the Protestant Reformation. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 10 Assistant Professor Munro.

Government 17b.--The Government of American Cities. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 2.30. Assistant Professor Munro, assisted by Mr. Hull.

Government 24.--Municipal Reform in the United States. Monday, Wednesday, at 11, and a third hour at the pleasure of the instructor. Dr. E. H. Goodwin.

Greek 11.--History of Greek Tragedy.--Study of plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 12. Professor Gulick.

Greek and Latin 5. -- Methods and Equipment of a teacher of Classics in secondary schools. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 3.30. Associate Professor C. P. Parker.

History 11b.--History of England during the Stuart Period. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 10. Junior Professor Cross (University of Michigan).

Mathematics 27. -- The Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. Hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor Huntington.

Philosophy 21a.--Animal Behavior.--The Evolution of Organic Activity. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 12. Assistant Professor Yerkes.

Philosophy 24. -- Contemporary Philosophical Issues. A story of Pragmatism, the New Realism, and recent forms of Individualism. Lectures, required reading, thesis. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 9. Professor Royce.

Semitic 2.--Hebrew.--Syntax. Extensive Reading in the Old Testament. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, at 9. Dr. Davey.

Social Ethics 5.--The Moral Responsibilities of the Modern State. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 12. Dr. McConnell.

Social Ethics 6.--Social Ameltoration in Europe. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 11. Dr. Foerster