CLOSER RELATIONS WITH THE FACULTY.

Among the two or three most persistent opinions voiced in the Class Reports by Seniors and recent graduates in reply to the question. "What advantage do you think you ought to have found at Harvard which you have failed to find?" is the matter of closer relations between the Faculty and students. It seems to be an almost universal regret among graduates that they did not utilize to better advantage the opportunity while in College of becoming personally acquainted with such great characters as Dean Shaler and Professor Norton. Among the undergraduates the same feeling is expressed concerning many of the better-known men of the present Faculty.

And we all know that such a condition continues to exist. How many of us have been advised to take certain courses "because of the personality of the instructor. Professor -- is a great man and you ought to know him." But how many times in such a case do we ever approach closer than the restrictions of the lecture hall allow? The superiority of the larger universities is due to the fact that their greater resources enable them to obtain men who are at once efficient teachers and intellectual leaders. Seldom, however, do we make use of this advantage which Harvard possesses in so high a degree. Many students there are in the University who are not even on speaking acquaintance with a single one of their past or present instructors.

Almost every member of the Faculty is at home to students some time during every week. Certainly, a leisure hour could not be spent more profitably than in accepting such hospitality.