The Union As An Eating Place.

Communication

(We invite all men in the University to submit communications on subjects of timely interest, but assume no responsibility for sentiments expressed under this head.)

To the Editors of the CRIMSON:

Your recent article on the comparative desirability of Memorial Hall and of the Harvard Union as boarding places for students calls for a word of explanation. The almost universal consensus of hygienic opinion today is against eating houses that provide for their patrons no attractive rooms for pleasant social intercourse before and after the meals. "To chat and smile and wait awhile" instead of rushing in and out is now a rule of health for all self-respecting persons so widely recognized that no restaurant or dining room is considered well regulated that is not immediately connected with a pleasant social room.

Memorial Hall, as all similar eating houses, was constructed before these higher hygienic opinions began to prevail. The Harvard Union had the advantage of later ideas and very wisely adopted them; therefore it is already, and more and more will become, the ideal place in Cambridge for all members of the University to take their meals. The poorest as well as the richest can here find not only excellent food at reasonable prices, but also an environment of sociability and of quietude favorable to the best dietary conditions of health. MARTIN KELLOGG SCHERMERHORN

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