YALE WON BY STRAIGHT FOOTBALL

But Substitute Backs Had Hard Time Getting Through Brown Line.

Yale defeated Brown on Saturday after a hard fight by the close score of 14 to 6. The results of the Yale-Princeton and Harvard-Brown games this coming Saturday will afford an excellent opportunity for a comparison of the University and Yale teams, inasmuch as the later eleven opposes Princeton, defeated 20 to 0 by the University and Brown comes to the Stadium after forcing Yale to resort to their best plays in order to obtain a victory by a single touchdown.

The playing of the almost discredited Brown eleven was wholly unforecasted by any previous work of the team. But while her attack had improved remarkably and her defence to a somewhat lesser extent the splendid showing of the Brown eleven was due in a large measure to the weakness of the Yale line. The playing of Captain Talbott strengthened the forward defence perceptibly, but upon his withdrawal the men seemed unable to put up a concerted opposition to the opponents' attack. Time and again the Brown backfield, headed by Murphy, slipped through holes for consistent gains. Yale used a substitute backfield throughout the game, and the men played well. Ainsworth, Scovil, Easton, and Guernsey ripped the Brown line to pieces and three times marched down the entire length of the field in short steady gains. A new formation involving a triple pass was successfully employed several times for gains of considerable length by the major eleven, but costly fumbles immediately following deprived the team of any advantage gained. The fumbling of both elevens was conspicuously noticeable throughout the contest, neither team seeming capable of hanging on to the ball.

Forward passing constituted a good part of the repertoire of plays of both the elevens, but not much success attended the numerous attempts. Straight old-fashioned line-plunging and a succession of punts were again the dominant factors in the ground gaining of either team. With the possible exception of one or two of the smaller colleges none of the football teams have perfected the open style game this year. Occasionally when resorted to as the last hope, it has proved successful, but consistent gaining with any degree of certainty has never resulted from its use. The Yale team scored a touchdown on straight football in the first period, but throughout the next two periods neither eleven was able to force the ball over the line. At the beginning of the last quarter the Brown eleven counted on a series of end runs and a fortunate forward pass. With but five minutes left to play and leading by a meagre one point, the Yale team, re-enforced by the return of Captain Talbott, rushed the ball by hard line plunges down to the opponent's five-yard line. Scovil, on the fourth down pushed the ball across for the final score just previous to the end of the game.