COMMENT

Indifference.

One of the factors in the life of the university which is not the topic of general conversation but which nearly every one recognizes individually is the tendency for indifference upon some of the most vital phases of college.

Indifference plays a prominent part in keeping classmates from getting acquainted with one another; the fact that men don't care about what their associates are doing results not only in a failure to appreciate the good qualities of one another, but serves to promote misunderstanding as to the character and ability of individuals. Oftentimes cliques arise which have not enough interest in the other members of their class or the university to regard anything but clique concerns.

Indifference is present in the minds of some faculty members who do not try to keep in touch with the members of their classes except in a superficial way. In some classes which are supposed to be for fifth group men alone, it is hard for a man of superior ability to get a higher group than fifth, because the instructor does not investigate sufficiently the different qualifications of his students.

Indifference is manifest in the association between the faculty and the student body. For the most part, there is not a close relationship--as there ought to be--between the student and his professor. Such a close companionship is infinitely desirable; there is no doubt that the indifference hinders its attainment.

In another column is an appeal from a correspondent for Princeton to wake up. Indifference to the seriousness of what the European nations are facing has led to the calm, matter-of-fact, satisfied aspect concerning life which is so much to be deplored. Princeton is sleeping, peacefully not only as regards the immense national issues which demand deep consideration, but also those university issues which are evils because of indifference. Daily Princetonian