INTELLIGENCE BUREAU FORMED

INTERCOLLEGIATE ORGANIZATION AIDS DEPARTMENTS IN WAR WORK.

Since February, 1917, nearly 150 colleges, technical schools and universities organized as the Intercollegiate Intelligence Bureau have been giving special aid to the country. Brought into existence almost at the direct request of the Secretaries of War and the Navy, the Bureau has been greatly used by Government departments. About 4,000 men of specialized training have been placed at important war work on the request of Government officers for men having a variety of training and experience.

In a number of cases the Bureau served when other sources had failed. The method used was to have an adjutant and committee appointed at each educational institution which would organize as a co-operative unit of the Bureau. Through questionnaires and otherwise the adjutants kept on file accurate and adequate information of students and alumni so that the calls from the Washington office of the Bureau could be answered, by sending names of men who were fit and who could serve the Government. The extensive work of the Washington office was made possible, by volunteers from a dozen colleges, who gave their time and expenses while carrying the Bureau into Government departments. Committees of college men have been organized in cities because of the large number of desirable and available men there.

Important calls from the Government continue to come in and the primary work will go on. Industrial and commercial establishments are calling for help and their necessities are hardly secondary to those of the Government. Colleges and universities want more and more specialized information about Government departments and their activities.

The Union will register men who are about to come home, as much in advance as possible, and will send their qualifications and desires for future employment to the Bureau here, which will try to have a place for them when they arrive. The Bureau will be ready to steer those who have been severely injured and may have to adopt new activities. It will be the work of the Bureau to make them acquainted with the new conditions which will exist here, and help them to get a good and prompt start at rebuilding.