INFLUENZA WELL IN HAND

Isolate Epidemic Patients in Stillman.--Suspected Cases in Standish.

Cases of Spanish Influenza, at the University and among the students in the S. A. T. C. have been kept well in hand throughout this week, and at present Stillman Infirmary, where the Influenza cases are being treated, has the best record of any hospital in the vicinity. There are now about 60 cases of Influenza at Stillman, but there have been no deaths from the disease. In the Boston hospitals there has been an average mortality of 20 per cent, of all Influenza cases admitted. At Camp Devens, where there are some 48,000 men, there have been 15,000 cases and 590 deaths.

The record at the University has been attained by careful precautionary methods which have been in force since September 23. Twelve members of the fourth year class at the Medical School have been in Cambridge to watch especially for Influenza cases. A medical officer, from this number, has been assigned to each company, one is in charge at the Infirmary, one is in charge of the suspected cases isolated in Standish Hall, one is acting as special assistant to Dr. Bailey, University physician, and another is stationed at the Locker Building, where the S. A. T. C. physical examinations are being held, to watch for new cases.

All Sneezes Reported.

Last Monday the meetings of all courses in the University with an enrolment of more than 50 students were discontinued. At the same time, instructors and professors were requested by the College Office to report any men who were coughing or sneezing. At present it is planned to continue the meetings of all courses on Monday.

Men who havea cold, cough, or feeling of sickness have been directed to so report to their company medical officer, or to Dr. Bailey. Of such men, about 50 are now being quartered in the A and B entries of Standish, where they are isolated from further infection and cannot spread the disease to others. If these suspected cases turn into Influenza, the men are sent to the Infirmary, or else are discharged as soon as their health is normal again.

To this careful treatment of suspected cases may be ascribed the low number of cases among students at the University. For the history of past cases has shown that the sooner the cold or Influenza is taken in hand, the lighter the case will be, and the smaller the chance of the development of pneumonia.