THE UNION AS A HOST

In announcing a dance after the Princeton Triangle Club performance in Boston, the Union is inaugurating a plan of entertainment long needed at Harvard. Too many groups from other colleges have visited Cambridge and have received no undergraduate entertainment. In the past the traditional parties at the Copley have made it nearly impossible to stage a successful dance in Cambridge, as was seen this year at the Union dance before the Princeton game. We certainly should neither trust to these public dances nor desire to have them stand as an expression of Harvard good fellowship.

This attitude on the part of Harvard undergraduates toward outside college visitors has not contrasted well with the welcome accorded Harvard men at Princeton and Yale. At each of these, fraternity and college dances are held to which all Harvard men are either invited directly or at liberty to attend. Both Yale and Princeton realize the great part played by these entertainments in the pleasure of visitors from Cambridge and the friendly feeling that mutually exists at these affairs.

At this coming dance we have an opportunity both to indicate our gratitude to the Princeton players for their generous spirit in turning over the proceeds of their show to the Endowment Fund and to make known that our failure to provide entertainment in the past has not been due to any lack of friendly feeling.