Advertisement

BLUE BOOKS AND BANQUETS

The Class of 1925 is doing its best to disprove the charge which the CRIMSON correspondent brought against 1923 yesterday--that the classes no longer enjoy getting--together as units. Beginning with its recent plan to make its foreign students feel more welcome, 1925 has followed with two moves of even greater interest. Prior to the War, each Sophomore class used to have a class book and a banquet. In 1918, being non-essentials, they died a very natural death; but the present class officers, looking into the dusty past, have decided that they may appropriately disinter them this year.

Both banquet and Blue Book were originally founded with the idea of binding the class together. Through Sophomore and Junior years it is especially easy for the members of a class to drift apart to the four corners of Cambridge. When the Senior year arrives, unless something has been done to counteract such a tendency, the list of lost, strayed, and stolen is and to be long. The Blue Book, an unpretentious volume, will narrate the class activities for the year, list each member with his individual record, and serve as a handy directory. As long as it is not made too elaborate, and does not unnecessarily duplicate the Red Book, it performs a reasonable and useful function.

As for the banquet, it would seem to be a natural culmination to the series of smokers, and its advantages as a "get together" are obvious. Perhaps it is unkind to recall now the one blemish on the 1926 record its Freshman Jubilee. If the banquet is taken in a similar spirit, it will not be a precedent that other classes will care to follow. On the other hand, if put to its best uses, it may provide the very link that is needed between the Freshman Dormitories and the Yard.

Advertisement