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A SANE DEVELOPMENT

Arguing for a development of boxing as an intercollegiate sport four years ago, Dr. Paul Withington declared: "It is as clean as any other sport we have, and if conducted properly, should develop the same good sportsmanship as football or track." And probably even the giant Firpo will now admit that its essence is skill and not brute strength. If comparison is made with other sports, boxing is certainly to be preferred to wrestling and is less dangerous than football. But its organization on an intercollegiate basis offers inherent difficulties as exemplified by the recent ruling of Yale authorities that unless cheering was conducted with more decorum no spectators would be allowed at collegiate bouts.

As an inter-mural sport, however, boxing offers splendid possibilities for development. Its restriction to University men climinates most of the objectionable features; the organization of a Freshman Interdormitory contest is a first step toward the popularization of a sport that probably pays larger dividends to the individual participant than any other. At the same time, the direction of boxing into this channel conforms to the growing tendency to eliminate as far as possible an undue emphasis on intercollegiate contests. Major Moore's statement that the Athletic Committee will probably not reconsider its decision on the status of boxing in the University is altogether in accordance with a national interpretation of the function of college athletics.

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