MOORE FINDS STUDENTS ARE MORE INTELLECTUAL

Recent Changes in Harvard Educational System Have Given Undergraduates More Active Minds

A larger intellectual interest among undergraduates and a distinct advance in the development of more active minds is suggested as the important result of the recent educational changes in the University by Professor Clifford H. Moore '89.

Professor Moore, who has just been appointed to succeed Dean Briggs as Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, discusses the recent progress in the University in the current issue of the Alumni Bulletin.

"One result of the deepened interest in intellectual pursuits must not be overlooked," says Professor Moore. "To do a man's best, according to his ability, in whatever he puts his hand and mind to, is properly reckoned a sure test of character; the slacker and loafer are rightly despised. To stimulate young men to do their best in college is to help them build the character that should result from a college education."

To encourage undergraduates to regard the mastery of some object as a fundamental part of their college careers the degree with distinction "in a subject or related subjects" was established leading directly to the general examinations and the present tutorial system. The general final examina- tions are planned to test intellectual power rather than memory. "In short," says Professor Moore, "the present plan makes for liberal education in the true sense of the word, and gives the faithful student intellectual habits that tend to make him a cultivated, effective, and useful citizen all his life.

"One result of the deepened interest in intellectual pursuits must not be overlooked. To do a man's best, according to his ability, in whatever he puts his hand and mind to is properly reckoned a sure test of character: the slacker and loafer are rightly despised. To stimulate young men to do their best in college is to help them build the character that should result from a college education.