Foreigners Responsible for Chinese Difficulties Kwong Asserts--Chang Only Leader Interested in People's Good

"Every nation has rights in China but China herself," declared Victor Kwong, prominent Chinese student, to a CRIMSON representative yesterday. Mr. Kwong, a graduate of the Boston University School of Business Administration, and at present studying in the Boston University College of Liberal Arts, is president of the Chinese Student Christian Association.

"To understand intelligently the Chinese problem of today," began Mr. Kwong, cope must realize that China is a very much older country than any in Western civilization. America was discovered in 1492, less than five hundred years ago; Chinese history, on the other hand, dates back to 2400 B. C. Confucius, the great philosopher and religious leader, wrote a history of China in the year 60 B. C. and it was this same civilization, with no great changes, which existed in China in the earlier part of the nineteenth century, and which, in fact, to a large extent remains unchanged at the present day. Such a history naturally gives to the Chinese a large measure of national consciousness, and makes them inclined to view with suspicion the domineering policies of the much younger Western civilization.

"At present there are in China three main contenders for power, Chang Tsolin, in the North, Feng Yo-hsi-hsiang in the West, and Chiang Kai-shek in the South. Of these three there is only one, the southern general, Chang, who really has the true interests of his country at heant.

"Chang started recently from Canton with an army of 100,000 students. It must be remembered that there is no railroad between the North and the South of China, thus it is necessary to move troops on foot. Within two months Chang has marched 600 miles; and although his government has not yet been recognized by the powers, it is at present the most influential in China. I think that Europe will have to recognize this Canton government sooner or later; and when this takes place, the present phantom Pekin government will vanish entirely.

"Japan's policy has undergone a radical change since 1919. Prior to that time, she was inclined to be imperialistic, but she low realizes that she is floating in the same boat with China; so since an mineralized China will be but a stepping stone to a subdued Japan. There is indeed, a strong possibility of an alliance between China, Japan, and Russia, in defense against Western imperialism."