THE STUDENT VAGABOND

Although blue Monday is the day I generally set aside for recuperation from week ends, I am going to leave bed early this morning in order to hear Professor Hocking lecture in the New Lecture Hall at 10 o'clock on Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. As every vagabond is interested in his confreres, I have always felt a considerable interest in good old Jean Jacques, and Professor Hocking's talk which will present him in company with two others whose waywardness has occassionally caused them to be likened to vagabonds, I cannot afford to miss.

Not only because of a contemplated trip of vagabondage to Italy next summer, but also because of a lecture I once heard in Fogg, I have a desire for completer understanding of the early Christian basilicas in Rome. At noon today I am going to Robinson Hall to hear Professor Conant's talk which will make clear many points I should like to have explained.

This afternoon there are two events which I must not overlook. At King's Chapel in Boston Dr. Gastave Kruger will speak at 2 o'clock on recent tendencies in the German church. At 4.30 o'clock comes what bids fair to be the most interesting lecture of the day. The story of the actors, authors and scenery of the early French Theatre will be told in Emerson J by Professor Jeanroy whose previous lectures on the origins of the first theatres in France have convinced me that it was the gentlemen of my own metier who were responsible for the development of the theatre. Pride in my vocation makes it impossible for me to neglect this afternoon's lecture.