OTTO GROW WILL BRING COLLIER TO UNION TALK

COLLIER AN HONORARY MEMBER OF CLASS OF '15 AT DARTMOUTH

Franklin P. Collier, well-known cartoonist and creator of Otto Grow, will speak at the Union on Wednesday, March 24, on "The Trials of a Cartoonist's Life." Mr. Collier has been drawing for 20 years and has spoken at the University and at Dartmouth in previous years. His talk at the Union last year was warmly received by a large audience and Mr. Collier was greatly amused at the time to see the rush at the conclusion of his lecture for the drawings which he had hastily done as illustrations. His lecture this year will be on similar topics and will be illustrated by his drawings of members of the audience.

He has announced his intention of bringing Otto with him, together with several members of Otto's family. Mr. Collier has been drawing Otto for the last eight years, and has been so successful that he has added considerably to the family, of which the most prominent members are May, his wife; Mrs. Lotts Biggar, his mother-in-law; Dewey and Wanna, the twins, and Lotta, Kenny, and Willie, the other children. Mr. Collier freely makes additions to the family whenever he finds it to be to his advantage. In satirizing prominent people or current events he puts a squashed hat on his subject and gives him a name as near the original as possible. The most popular of these are Kidman Grow, for Dr. Cadman, Martin Grow, for Mr. Martin Lomasney, and Homer Grow, for Mr. Homer Loring. Mr. Collier takes great delight in doing this and says it is very easy as we are really all Grows.

For four years Otto had no name and was known in society merely as "the Little Guy." Mr. Collier then offered a prize of $10 for a name and received 1400 suggestions.

Mr. Collier is not a college graduate but is an honorary member of the class of '15 at Dartmouth. When asked why he chose that particular class he said "that if I had gone to college I would have entered in 1901, and I figured that I would have graduated just about then."

The cartoonist has tried his hand at oil-painting and sculpture, but likes newspaper work better.