THE PRESS

"Not . . . Disinterested"

The baseball game between the staffs of our estimable contemporaries, the Harvard CRIMSON and the Daily Princetonian, if not definitely settling the question of muscular supremacy between their respective institutions, at least demonstrated the amazing fact that undergraduates of the two universities represented are still capable of competing against each other without bloodshed or even injured feelings. In fact, so delighted were the editors at this discovery that each publication has since suggested and urged the renewal of official athletic relations between their universities.

Not as mere disinterested witnesses of one of the most spectacular and ridiculous outbreaks of ill-feeling that has ever occurred between colleges, it is none of our business how long Harvard and Princeton choose to nurse their small grudges against one another. The rights and wrongs of the original dispute are of no consequence to us, nor should they remain so to either of these once friendly rivals. Both universities have relatively so much in common, both in academic standards and athletic tradition, that any permanent estrangement should be mutually disapproved. That they will eventually resume athletic relations, perhaps as soon as all parties to the quarrel have graduated, seems a reasonably, safe prediction.

It, however, the CRIMSON and the Princetonian succeed in hastening a renewal of this old acquaintanceship their efforts are to be commended. Shaking hands and cancelling old grudges is a more delicate maneuver for rival athletic associations than it is for quarrelsome small boys, but in this case little excuse remains for a longer postponement of the truce. Vale Daily News.