Marx Brothers Do Not Doff Humor With Make-up, Crimson Interviewer Learns--Witticisms Usually Extemporaneous

The four Marx Brothers, Chico, Harpo, Groucho, and Zeppo, in a frolicking mood, even as they are on the stage and screen, were "at home" in the sanctity of their dressing rooms at the Metropolitan last night, where they are now playing a short engagement.

The look of gratified curiosity on their guests' faces when they met the four famous brothers evoked a smile from Groucho. "I see that you're easily pleased," he began.

"Oh, sewer he is," chimed in Chico.

"Well that cleans that up," came back Groucho, and so the interview began. The brothers, casting off their stage characteristics, but still sprinkling humor in their remarks, freely talked of their lives and their views on the theatre Strangely enough, the head spokesman was Chico, of the inimitable Italian accent, the oldest of the four.

"For 20 years," said Chico, "we have played on the stage Starting as waits in the East Side of New York, we each went on the stage individually, but it was not until we four joined together that we met success."

"However," interrupted Groucho, "I once left the stage to enter the railroad business, but I soon tired of the ties we received on Christmas. I might be a bit premature," he added, "but I contracted that on my father's side."

They all agreed that the theatre was in the throes of depression, not however due to the talkies. They maintained that it was merely one of the phrases in the present world wide condition.

Their attitude toward the talkies was one of personal enthusiasm, for the remuneration is much greater, while the time taken to make their pictures took but a short lapse of four weeks.

"Although we have a written outline of our own shows," continued Chico, "practically all our remarks are of our own manufacture, and our actions for the most part extemporaneous."

It was interesting to learn the origin of the musical abilities of Chico and Harpo. Although they play practically every instrument, they have never taken an actual lesson.

Harpo, Chico, and Zeppo are married, but Harpo, the pantominist, who says nothing on the stage and would pass for a dumb man, proved himself to be a 100 per cent talkie.

"I've never married," he explained, "for I can't find a wife who will talk less than I do."

"You'll pardon us, while we all go out and get run over," apologized Groucho, as the foursome left the room