SUPERIOR BRITISH TWELVE DEFEATS HARVARD 9 TO 5

Went Down to Defeat at Hands of St. John's Team--Certain to Take Back Flannery Cup

Before a crowd estimated at 2,000, the Oxford-Cambridge lacrosse team continued its victorious tour of the East by defeating the Crimson stickmen, 9 to 5, yesterday afternoon on the field behind the Business School.

The English team is practically certain to carry back to England the Flannery Cup, emblematic of international lacrosse supremacy. During its stay in the United States, the team has been defeated only once, by St. John's, in its first game after arriving; and altogether, the visitors have amassed a total of 108 goals, to the Americans' 36. Since there is only one more game to be played in the series, with Brown, it is now impossible for the Americans to retain the trophy.

Harvard Outplayed

The Oxford-Cambridge team outplayed Harvard during the first half, A. S. Rains, Cambridge undergraduate, counting four of the Englishmen's five goals. The Crimson's only score during this period came when T. I. Nido '30, playing at center, broke through the visitors' almost impenetrable defense to score cleanly. The teams were playing a man to man game throughout, and the superior defense of the Oxford-Cambridge team was the deciding fact or of the contest. During the first half, it also showed surer stickhandling than the Crimson.

In the second half, the Harvard team was greatly improved, and, aided by substitutions, was able to hold the English team to an even score, each side making four goals. During the whole game, however, the same 12 men play- ed for Oxford-Cambridge. In this half, Harvard succeeded in keeping the ball away from its own end of the field for the greater part of the playing, but was rarely able to reach scoring distance.

The work of the Oxford-Cambridge defense, directed by A1 Cornsweet, former Brown football captain, was the feature of the game; the individual playing of Rains, who scored six goals, five of them unassisted, was the mainstay of the team's offense. Harvard's greatest power was in its offense.

The summary:

OXFORD-CAMBRIDGE  HARVARDRicketts, g.  g., Gulick, SalmonCornsweet, c.pt.  c.pt., RobinsonCartwright, pt.  pt., MyersonFarinholt, 1d.  1d., HartnettAinsworth, R., 2d  2d., Faude, HodgesGrove, 3d.  3d., Brinckley, Pattison, AmazeenFielden, c.  c., Nido, HobbsWilliams, 3a  3a., Pope, Marshall, Henderson, KeckRains, 2a.  2a., Cochrane, BriggsAinsworth, G., 1a.  1a., Glenn, FoshayGiddens, o.h.  o.h., Johnson, LayAstle, i.h.  i.h., Sanders, Kuh