EARNINGS OF MEN ON PART TIME JOBS SHOW SMALL DROP

Sharpe Gives Out Statistics in Annual Report to President Lowell--Notes Difficulty in Getting Jobs

A total of $312,910 was earned by students in the University in part-time work in the year 1931-32, it was revealed yesterday by Russell T. Sharpe '28, secretary for Student Employment, in his annual report to President Lowell. This amount is in addition to scholarships and other aids in the University amounting to $753,180, or a total of $1,066,090.

Four Percent Decrease

These figures compare with part-time earnings in the previous year of $375,028 and scholarships and other aids of $735,250, or a total of $1,110,278. The total amount of aids and earnings for 1931-32 represents a decline of about four per cent from the previous year. According to the summary, the Student Employment Office obtained directly part-time work for students yielding $210,664, as compared with $282,094 in the previous year. There was an increase in the total number of positions filled, from 2,514 to 2,886, or 15 per cent. The decline in earnings results in part from the fact that there was a decrease in the number of positions extending throughout the term, and also to reductions in rates of pay for certain jobs.

The report calls attention to the increasing difficulty in obtaining commercial employment for students as a result of current business conditions. Commenting on a recent survey of 167 business firms, Mr. Sharpe says, "Executives were unanimous in stating that their concerns were having great difficulty in keeping even a skeleton force busy and on the payroll, and that, when part time or replacement work was available, it would be given to previous employees, reluctantly discharge through economic necessity. Many business men told us that, as they had pledged themselves to hire only married workers with dependents, they could not use students".