Russell To Cooperate "In Legitimate Way" With All University Problems

UNABLE TO TAKE STAND ON LIQUOR SITUATION

Richard M. Russell '14, candidate for reelection as mayor of Cambridge, will cooperate with Harvard "in all legitimate ways," he promises in a statement given to the CRIMSON last night setting forth his policy toward the University. "There are obligations and responsibilities on both sides," the Mayor adds.

Commenting on the proposal to close up Quincy Street and make it a part of the Yard, Mayor Russell states that "if such closing seems desirable to Harvard, it is the responsibility of the University to provide an alternate through route from Massachusetts Avenue to Kirkland Street, which would be equally acceptable to the citizens of the city as a whole."

Mayor Russell's statement follows in full:

"As far as the administration of the City of Cambridge is concerned, Harvard University does not fall into any special classification. It is one of several institutions in this city, including Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Radcliffe, and branches of Boston University. We are glad to have these institutions in the City, although there are obligations and responsibilities on both sides.

"In the past, I believe my record shows that I have cooperated with these institutions in all legitimate ways, and on the other hand, members of their staffs have been of great public service in the City.

"The question of the sale of alcoholic beverages within the University is one which I alone am not able to answer, for it is subject to the controlling legislation of the Commonwealth.

"In regard to the closing of Quincy street, the initiative rests with the University, and if such closing seems desirable to Harvard, it is the responsibility of the University to provide an alternate through route from Massachusetts avenue to Kirkland street which would be equally acceptable to the citizens of the city as a whole.

"This is a brief statement, but during these closing days of the campaign there will be other occasions when I shall address the citizens of Cambridge at greater length. In the meanwhile, I am glad to have this occasion to respond to the request of the CRIMSON, and to urge all its readers who are voters in Cambridge to come to the polls on Tuesday, November 7, between the hours of 6 A.M. and 6 P.M. and register their votes in the cause of good government.