MATHER GIVES LECTURE ON GEOLOGY THURSDAY

HAS WRITTEN BOOKS ON SCIENCE AND RELIGION

Kirtley Mather, professor of Geology, will deliver the first of a series of five afternoon lectures on scientific progress in the last 100 years, when he talks on "Progress in Discovering How the World Was Made" on Thursday afternoon. The lecture will be a popular survey of certain lines of geological advancement of knowledge over the last century, designed to give significance to those aspects of the Chicago "Century of Progress Exposition," which bear on geology. Professor Mather will speak in the Geological Lecture Room, in the University Museum at 4 o'clock, and will illustrate his talk with numerous lantern slides.

Professor Mather will probably cover the various theories of the formation of the earth, whether from nebular matter in space; or perhaps by a breaking off from the sun owing to a tidal wave created by a passing comet, the Jeans theory. He will present the various conjectures and discoveries about the formation of the earth's shell of rock.

Mather is a Chicago man by birth, and received his college B.S. at Denison University in 1909. He came to Harvard first in 1924, was made professor of geology in 1927, and has served as the head of the Department of Geology and Geography.

Besides a varied career as an explorer he has written many books, technical and popular. Among his best known works are "Old Mother Earth," and "Science in Search of God."