Night And Day

Now that after a century it is permissable to sell beer to Indians, it's about time Harvard got it. There has been an old law since 1837 prohibiting the sale of alcoholic liquors in Indian Territory, but before 1800 at Harvard students were encouraged to buy rum because the College got more of a substantial revenue from it than they had from the operation of the ferry across the Charles.

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Last week the International News Service carried a statement purporting to come from John Roosevelt, 17-year old son of the President, saying that instead of coming to Harvard from Groton, he had without his father's knowledge decided to go to Princeton.

The INS quoted him as saying: "Harvard is too near the cities. I prefer the open country." No information could be obtained from the Committee on Admissions as to whether his application had been withdrawn. The outcome will be interesting. During his college career, President Roosevelt was president of the CRIMSON in 1904, and made a rather famous investigation to insure adequate fire apparatus and escapes in dormitories.

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At Columbia last week a beer license was obtained principally because of the fact that in a six-week period patronage fell off so sharply in the John Jay Dining Halls (the cause of the strike last Spring) that further resistance to the Columbia Spectator's editorials would have been suicidal.

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There is a certain naive mystery about the popularity which walking has acquired among the nice young men and their dates. It certainly cannot be that Depression is responsible; nor can it be laid to mere lethargy; nor to the general putridity of Boston orchestras.

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Now after the House Masters at Harvard have virtually begged to have beer in the Dining Halls and it is known that some of the highest officials in University Hall see no objections, nothing has been done. Much talk was made about getting a license quietly to avoid open clash with local merchants and people who have not sympathy for the College because educational institutions are not required to pay taxes.

The idea that "all the world loves a lover" apparently leaves the robust subordinates of Mr. Apted quite cold. Heaven only knows how many budding romances that might conceivably lead to finer things have been hopelessly atropied by the insistence of those ample gentlemen that there be no sitting upon the dormitory steps. No official explanation of this action is forthcoming; hence, we can only assume that so much easily combustible material upon the steps constitutes a dangerous fire hazard.

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If each House organized itself as a club beer would be perfectly possible, and if the University Dining Halls handled the brew as profitably as they do the food, there would be no doubt that a third "Gold Room Guard" could be added to the Adams House force next year, but it seems that lawyers investigating consider the club plan a culpable evasion of law.

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We have it from good authority--well, pretty good--that, with that strange perversity which characterizes all officialdom, the majority of attractive girls have been placed in the top floors of the dormitories. Thus, in its own subtle way does the university do its bit toward elevating the standards of its young ladies.