THE CRIME

Here are our last two stories of the year about this naive class of 1937. Taken from intellectual and social sources, they reveal an unhappy state of affairs for the thousand Freshmen who have just completed nine months at Harvard. It seems that one of them took the tutoring school's remarks about the bourgeois status of Professor Holcombe seriously and decided to act accordingly.

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For an hour and a half he wrote religiously on the examination Monday and then the persistent itching of his toes was too much for him. With dignity, he went over to one of those tablets which commemorate our dead in the Civil War and there removed his shoes and socks. Taking a bottle from his pocket, he emptied its contents on the offending areas. Two minutes later, lotion, socks, and the student were back in their seat again and the exam was proceeding serenely. No protest was heard.

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The other story, full of pathos, concerns the young Freshman from the West, uninitiated in the social arts, who found himself unexpectedly on a dance floor with an attractive girl. To his horror, he suddenly felt someone tap him on the shoulder and away went gliding his beauty with her rescuer.

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The next day an older friend of his anxiously called up the girl's mother and said, "Please tell me quite frankly how John misbehaved last night. He tells me that while they were dancing someone tapped him on the shoulder and took Betty away. He can't imagine how he insulted her."