10 CONANT FELLOWS AND 23 SCHOLARS SELECTED

PRIZE FELLOWS OF LAST YEAR FULFILL EXPECTATIONS

Ten incoming freshmen have been awarded the second Conant Prize Fellowships while 23 others who were runners-up in the selection have been granted scholarships. Both stipends vary according to the financial need of the applicant although the selections are made without regard to financial status. Over 150 students, the majority of whom ranked first in their classes tried for the honor which was extended to Kentucky and Iowa for the first time this year.

The awards vary from a minimum of $200 to a maximum of $1,000 in the Freshman year and $1,200 each year thereafter depending on the resources of the recipients. In selecting the winners, the committee considered originality, initiative, leadership ability, and character as well as scholastic ability.

The Prize Scholars of last year have fulfilled the expectations of the committee and have all had their grants renewed. Two of them received all A's, seven were in group II and the remaining man was in group 111.

The Kentucky Prize was made possible by a grant from the Jessie Preston will be given annually while the Iowa prize, from money of the Charles Eliott Perkins Scholarship Fund will be awarded in alternate years.

Prize Fellowships

The winners of the fellowships are:

David M. Geoder, age 17, of 458 Willow road, Winnetka, Ill. He attended New Trier High School. He is the son of Lealie M. Gooder, vice-president in charge of sales for the V. P. Blakely Printing Company, and a trustee of Northwestern University. He ranked first in scholarship among the boys in his graduating class, and won the Harvard Club if Chicago Award for Scholarship for three years in high school. He was a member of the track team. In high school he was elected to the honor society in recognition of scholastic ability and leadership.

James Tobin, age 17, of 916 West Hill street, Champaign, Ill. He is the son of Louis M. Tobin, Director of Publicity, Athletic Association, University of Illinois. He was the highest ranking student in his class at University High School, Urbana, Ill., and was a leader in school activities. He was editor-in-chief of the school yearbook, was class Commencement orator, was elected head of the Junior class, was Senior chairman of the school assembly, was business manager of the dramatic club, and was a member of the basketball team. He was first in his district in the national Latin contest of the American Classical League, was third in Illinois in a citizenship essay contest, won first place in a competitive county scholarship examination, won the local high school medal awarded annually by the National Honorary Classics Fraternity, and had high marks in various state and national scholarship tests.

Karl F. Guthe, age 16, of Ann Arbor, Mich. He attended University of Michigan High School. He is the son of Carl E. Guthe, Director of the Museum of Anthropology of the University of Michigan, and former Research Associate in Archaeology at the Carnegie Institution, former Austin Teaching Fellow at Harvard University, and former member of the faculty of Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. Guthe was tied for first place in scholarship ranking in his high school class, was president of the Latin club, was a member of the student government council, and was a member of the school orchestra, band, and glee club. He won letters in swimming and track.

Robert M. Coquillette, age 16, of 816 Belmont avenue, Flint, Mich. He attended Flint Central High School. He is the son of Leon W. Coquillette, member of the faculty of General Motors Institute of Technology. He was valedictorian of his class, was a member of the student council, a member of the debating team, president of the band, was on the staff of the school annual, and was a leader in school clubs. This year he won the D. A. R. prize in the city of Flint for receiving the highest mark in a high school competitive examination in United States history.

Robert W. Bean, age 17, of 143 Baughnstreet, Council Bluffs, Ia. He attended Abraham Lincoln High School. He is the son of William E. Bean, cashier for the Omaha branch of the John Deere Plow Company. He ranked first in his class in scholarship. He was active in debating, dramatics, the glee club, the Latin club, and the literary society, and was a cadet captain in the R. O. T. C. He won first place in the Iowa State extemporaneous speaking contest, first place in the University of South Dakota interstate oratorical contest for students in Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, and won first place in the Council Bluffs original oratory contest. He has written for the school paper. He was used as a speaker in Council Bluffs for community financial drives and for the Red Cross. He was a member of the high school tennis team.

Richard H. Sullivan, age 17, of 624 Fourth street, Marietta, O. He attended Marietta High School. He is the son of Henry L. Sullivan, Superintendent of Schools in Marietta. He was tied for first place in scholarship ranking in his class and won first place in his county this spring in the general scholarship test for high school seniors. He was an officer of the student council and president of his class for one year. He was editor-in-chief of the school annual, was a leader in dramatics and debating, and was an officer of several student clubs. This year he had the highest score in a State of Ohio civil service examination in competition with both high school and college students. He has been a member of the track, basketball and football teams.

William N. Parker, age 16, of 521 Bulen avenue, Columbus, O. He attended East High School in Columbus. He is the son of Murray N. Parker, school book salesman. He ranked first in scholarship in his class. He was president of the student council, was a justice of the student court, a member of the debating team, an editor of the school paper, and was the winner of several prizes for essay writing. He was an officer of a club for the study of the Greek language. He was winner of the annual oratorical contest among the students of five high schools of Columbus on the general subject of the Constitution of the UnitedStates.

William W. Austin, age 15, of the Curtis Hotel, Minneapolis, Minn. He attended Central High School. He is the son of William M. Austin, accountant. He had high scholarship rating througout school, was elected a member of the National Honor Society, and was the winner of a music composition contest. He was also a member of the debating club, Latin club, and German club.

Fred W. Peel, age 16, of Lexington road, Danville, Ky. He attended Danville High School. He is the son of Fred W. Peel, bookkeeper. He ranked third in his high school class in scholarship. He was editor of the school annual, was class poet, was an editor of the school paper, and was president of the debating club. He won the current history essay contest of Scholastic magazine in 1934, was district winner in extemporaneous speaking in 1934-35, was winner of the local essay contest in 1934, and was third place winner in the State of Kentucky in a world history test in 1934.