"A PROCTOR'S LIFE . . . "

Of late much, and by no means entirely unwarranted, criticism has been leveled at the advisers and proctors. Cases have been brought to light showing that the proctors especially do not take their position seriously. Only this fall it was proved that one particularly wandering proctor had spent only two out of thirty-three nights in his room. It is up to the University to see that such abuses do not go unpunished; there is no reason why a proctor should not immediately lose his position if he violates his trust.

Last night's gathering of the powers which regulate a Freshman's life show that the advisers and proctors are recognizing more and more that they have a definite responsibility. The average Freshman has a wealth of bureaus to which he can turn to settle his difficulties. He has the dean's office, the Hygiene department, the officials at the Union, and Phillips Brooks House, as well as his adviser and proctor, to which he can apply for personal aid. And he needs all of these, for at last night's meeting Dean Leighton spoke of a Freshman, who a few years ago, reported to the Hygiene department a nervous wreck after his hour exams. He shivered and shook, but he was finally brought back to normal and then learned he had received two A's and two B's as his marks.

Coordinating the departments that watch over the progress of each and every Freshman is an important task. It is not unlikely that in the future one man could be appointed to have a position simply as coordinator of Freshman officialdom. The fact that an effort is being made towards alleviating a situation so detrimental to the career of the Freshman class as shown by last night's meeting, is in itself a step in the right direction.