Overset

STARTLED at a late hour last Thursday night by a dark-eyed woman in black gliding mysteriously across his path in the Yard, a Yard cop feared for the sanctity of the Freshman dormitories and stirred up quite a wake in pursuit.

"Say, lady, don't you know women aren't allowed in here at night? The gate's over there."

"Oh," came a velvety murmur from some place beneath the dark hat, "I am vairy zorry, I am zo strange!"

* * * * *

Harry's Club and Jim's Club are two new so-called social organizations which have been added to the list of frats open to Freshmen. Founded, or rather "recognized" by a group of club-minded members of the class, they rank on a par in exclusiveness with the Harvard Cooperative Society and Mike's Club, hitherto the only two open to first year men.

Harry's Club occupies a large building in the middle of the Yard, where members may gather from 9 in the morning to 10 o'clock in the evening for a pleasant hour or two of reading.

Jim's Club is located at 17 Quincy Street. Members may go there for tea on certain Sunday afternoons during the winter.

* * * * *

Two services are offered by the Telephone Company for moderate considerations which, surprisingly, have not become used in this seat of ingenuity.

It is possible to leave a message with the operator to have her call you at any hour in the morning. The advantages of this system are many. You can not put the telephone under your pillow like an alarm clock, and turn it off and go right back to sleep. You are certain to answer the telephone if you can hear it, for you never can tell what sweet thing might be calling you. And you almost feel as though your dreams had come true when you hear the cheery voice of the operator bidding you good morning.

Since it is also possible to hire Western Union boys for miscellaneous errands, it seems surprising that there is not a troop of them mounting the steps of Widener at about 8:58 o'clock every morning while the borrower of the book slumbers on in peace.