Sudden Increase In Student Posture Ratings Result of Physical Training

Assistant Director Fradd Sees His Work Spreading Back To Prep Schools

Harvard students stand straighter, have better muscular co-ordination today than their predecessors in the period just after the war. Such is the conclusion reached by Norman W. Fradd, assistant director of Physical Education, in a survey of research and training programs, extending over a period of 20 years in University service.

Figures compiled in a four-year cross section of both ends of the two decades show that there are five times as many men with "A" ratings now than in 1919, and that there were almost three times as many "D" men when Fradd first arrived on the scene as there are today.

Lower Groups Fall Off

"In the last three years the "C" and "D" groups have been dropping noticeably," Fradd revealed. "We can assume that the shrinkage in these figures is due to the work we are doing here."

Asked whether the unprecedented rise, in physical correctness was the result of his work having spread back into the private and public schools from which the University draws its entering Freshmen, he said: "There is no question about it."

Send Ratings Back

Annually for the last six years," the physical trainer stated, "we have sent back the ratings given Freshmen to the school which graduated them." He added that the figures were given 30 schools which enroll or six more boys at Harvard each year.

Ten schools are using similar methods of correction and special exercise programs, and after receiving the records relayed by Fradd's office often ask for information on body-building and post-are courses.

121 Get A's

In the class of 1942 "A" group ratings were given 121 men: 473 were listed in the "B" column, 234 in the "C," and 132 in the "D." Annually 1000 Freshmen undergo the department's examination, part of which is a study of the individual's back, feet and general balance.

Four silhouette pictures of each boy are taken as a part of the record. This is done previous to his medical examination so that a graphic permanent record may be discussed with each student in the examining room as part of his physical education.

Fradd scoffs at body-building correspondence courses, advertised in many magazines. "Music size does not necessarily indicate power," he said. "It is the co-ordinated whole, rather than the bulk which determine physical fitness and muscular agility." Trend of Posture Ratings Grades  1919-22  1935-8  1938 A  2.18%  10.48%  12.60% B  18.84  45.25  49.30 C  49.58  32.27  24.40 D  29.40  11.90  13.70