Eastern Swim Stars Will Compete for Intercollegiate Pool Titles at Harvard

League Contest to Take Place At Indoor Tank on Friday And Saturday

Best swimmers from all over the East will congregate in the Harvard pool Friday and Saturday for the invitation individual championships of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swimming League.

Although Yale, Princeton, Columbia, Dartmouth, Pennsylvania, Navy and Harvard comprise the league, outstanding mermen from other eastern universities have been invited to compete. However, each entrant must have turned in a time for his event equal or below the qualifying standards set up by league officials.

Stars of All Colleges

Such stellar performers as Van de Weghe, Hough, Van Oss, and Simpson of Princeton; the Brueckel brothers, Perryman, Endweiss, Good, and Burns of Yale; Vergeichik, Callahan, and Finnerty of Columbia; Williams, of Pennsylvania; Ostrander and White, Dartmouth, in addition to the Crimson tankmen.

White, of Bowdoin, holder of the New England league records in the 50 and 100, will also compete. He can negotiate the two-lap race in 23.4, and the century in 53.4. Men from Rutgers, Cornell, Wesleyan, Brown and Springfield will be in the running as well.

Captain Charlie Hutter, restricted by meet rules to competition in three events, will swim the 50,100, and 400 relay, thus being unable to race in the 220, in which event he is National champion. Contrary to reports from Yale, Eli captain Johnny Macionis will not be able to swim.

Stiff Dive Competition

With Greenhood, Endweiss, Danforth, Cranston, and Gibson in the dive, the spring-board event will offer the stiffest competition of the entire meet. Next closest will probably be the 220 breast-stroke, with Berizzl, Callahan, Hough, White, and Soltysiak all within five seconds on their best times.

Princeton's medley team will attempt to continue its record-cracking performances of this season, and will be far ahead of the rest of the field. However, if Jim Curwen swims anchor for the Crimson, the Tigers will be pressed to record-lowering time, as they were the night of the Princeton-Harvard meet when Cummin, Berizzi, and Curwen made the Tiger trio lower the world's record, unofficially, since Van de Wehe missed turn.