Tiger Medley Trio Flashes Thru World's Fastest 300

MEET ENDS TONIGHT

An unrecognized world's record in the 300-yard medley relay by Princetonians Al Van de Weghe, Dick Hough, and Hendrick Van Oss last night, was the high point of the first day of the individual championships of the Eastern swimming league, held in the Harvard pool.

Although the International Swimming Federation will not accept medley tank records, the Tiger trio nevertheless swam the fastest mixed 12 laps in the history of water sports, making Intercollegiate and National A.A.U. marks. Van de Weghe, doing his 100 in 59 flat, established an early lead over Crimson backstroker Cummin. Then Hough stretched the Tiger's lead to more than 10 yards, and Van Oss held his own with Don McKay to hang up the superb mark of 2:53.6. The Crimson were second, with Columbia and Brown following.

Hutter Takes 50 Final

Charlie Hutter took the finals in the 50 free-style in 23.3, failing to break his Harvard record of 23 flat. Although he started well, made a fast turn, and stroked along beautifully, the fact that all six lanes were occupied by splashing mermen probably cut his time down somewhat. Tonight Hutter will have his last Harvard pool chance at his 100 record of 52 flat. Reilly of Rutgers, and White of Bowdoin tied for second behind the Crimson captain, and Rose of Rutgers was fourth.

Out-pointing Dan Endweiss of Yale, Rusty Greenhood spun his way to the low-board diving championship scoring 105.53 points. Endweiss made 100.76 points, and was followed by Danforth of Yale, and Keating of Columbia. High-board competition will be held tonight.

Kendall is 2:11.2 Again

Equalling his best 220 free-style time of 2:11.2 for the third race this year, Willie Kendall surged out in front of Yale Captain Johnny Macionis to win by a substantial margin. The Eli star never really challenged for the lead. Jim Curwen turned in 2:17.7 for a last minute triumph for third place over Captain Jimmy Simpson of Princeton.

Graham Cummin bowed to Al Van de Weghe in the 150 backstroke, but took second place over Yale's Joe Burns, as the Tiger ace muscled his way to a great 1:34.5, equalling his own intercollegiate record. Cummin was clocked in 1:37.8, only five-tenths of a second slower than his best.

Tonight will find the swimmers from 17 eastern colleges competing in the 200 breaststroke, the 100 free-style, the 440 free-style, the three-meter (high) diving, and the 400 free-style relay. Harvard men have fine chances of winning all but the breaststroke.