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PRESIDENT CONANT ON NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

In 1913, Harvard's expansion into a university with national connections was the most conspicuous phase of its development. In 1938, the multiplication and strengthening of these connections is still one of the most significant features of Harvard's expansion. But although the game is yet in play, Harvard can look with satisfaction upon the large score already rolled up. Today, it draws its students from every section, every state of the nation. It has gone far in combatting regional misconceptions and prejudices. Each year, it does a little more to erase the stamp of sectionalism, to substitute the much prouder national seal.

Most of the credit for recent progress must go to President Conant and two of its educational innovations. The American History Plan is designed to promote an integrated conception of the civilization which America as a whole has produced. Still more important is the National Scholarship Plan, which brings to Harvard prime academic products of the South, Middle West, and Far West. Its benefits are twofold: it increases the scope of Harvard's services to the country, and its strengthens college life by contacts with new and varied points of view. President Conant has laid down an excellent highway; it remains for the University to travel farther upon it.

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