WINNING BOWDOIN ESSAYISTS RECEIVE $1700 PRIZE MONEY

Belknap, Sales Prizes Also Awarded; Four Honorable Mentions Included in Announcement

Bowdoin Prizes totalling $1700 will go to three Undergraduates, and to three graduate students this year. The prizes are given from a fund established by Governor James Bowdoin, A.B. 1745, and increased in 1901 by George S. Bowdoin. It is awarded for dissertations in English not exceeding 8000 words.

First prize, with $500, went to John A. Moore '38, of Clayton, Missouri, for an essay entitled "The Psychology of Euripides."

The second prize, of $200, was won by Robert E. Wernick '38, of Brighton, for a paper on "Moby Dick and Pierre: Society and Solitude."

Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. '38, won the third prize of $100 for an essay entitled "Orestes Brownson: Critic of the New Industrialism."

Honorable mention in the Undergraduate awards was given for essays by Hume Dow '38, of St. George, New York, on "The Poetry of Cecil Day Lewis"; by Courtney C. D. Smith '38, of Iowa City, Iowa, on "Tears of Eternity"; and by Donald R. Griffin '38, of Barnstable, on "Phantom Shapes that Hamt the Dusk."

Schlesinger won the third prize last year as well. The first two then went to Theodor H. Rome ocC and Arthur Szathmary '38 respectively.

Belknap and Sales Prizes

At the same time it was announced that Richard B. Wolf '41, of New York City, was the winner of the Jeremy Belknap prize of $50 for the best French composition written by a first year student in Harvard College.

The Sales prize of $60 for the best scholar in Spanish, from the bequest of Francis Sales, A.B. 1835, was divided between James Etmekjian '39, of Brighton and Kari T. Soule, Jr. '39, of Rochester, New York, as the result of an examination taken several weeks ago.

Graduate Prizes

Three graduate students also received $300 apiece from the Bowdoin fund. They are Philippe Dur 2G., A.B. '35, of New York City, who wrote on "The Use of History"; Raymond A. M. de Roover 2G.B., Lic-en-Sc. Com. et Fin. Institute Superieur de Antwerp, Belgium, 1924, of Antwerp, for an essay entitled "A Florentine Firm of Cloth Manufacturers"; and Leo Goldberg 4G., S.B. '34, of New Bedford, who wrote on "The Collaboration between Physics and Astrophysics with Reference to the Cosmic Behavior of Helium."

Honorable Mention among the Graduates went to Henry N. Smith 2G., Southern Methodist University, Texas '25, of Dallas, Texas, for an essay entitled "Emerson's Problem of Vocation."