Real Art Required to Be Burlesque Stripper, Georgia Sothern Explains

Dancer Works For Her Audience And Knows When They Like Her Routine

"I have a style all my own," said Georgia Sothern in an interview yesterday at the Old Howard Athenaeum. "Most teasers," the dynamic dancer continued, "just take off their clothes and parade around for their audience. Now I really work for my fans."

Miss Sothern explained that each stripper had a particular style, and that there was a definite art to the game. "After all," she added, "if no skill were required, any one could get up and disrobe."

According to the red-headed dancer, some of her public really felt her work was an art. On the other hand, the greater part of the burlesque clientele came for an entirely different reason.

There is little jealousy, explained Miss Sothern, between the professional women in the business. Although, a few years ago, there was cut threat competition among the various strippers, today that has almost abated.

Hub Really Appreciative

Doing the rounds between New York Philadelphia, Boston, Buffalo, and Miami keeps her on the go all year except during the summer, Miss Southern said. She continued, "Even though I enjoy playing New York the most, I find Boston audiences the most appreciative. I think the reason for it is that in all the other cities, the better clubs have a strip act included in the floor show. I don't remember having seen anything like that in the Hub."

"When your audience doesn't like you, you can feel it," the prima donna of nudity explained. "But when they enjoy you, you work yourself to the point of exhaustion for them."

Miss Sothern was not inclined to talk much about her personal life.