THE MUSIC BOX

Last evening, at Sanders Theatre, G. Wallace Woodworth, with the aid of the Harvard Glee Club, Radcliffe Choral Society, and the Navy Communications School Glee Club, added another scalp to his already impressive collection. The program itself was a combination of the very old and the very new; Vaughan Williams was followed by Allegri, Sweelinck by Milhaud, Bartok by Mozart, and Mozart by Fine. But in every case the desired effect was attained.

The opening Vaughan Williams work was slightly shaky, but from there on in, it was easy coasting. The Harvard group sang the Allegri "Miscrere" as well as it has ever sung, and the belles from Radcliffe hit the Bartok choruses on all four. Above and beyond this, the evening was a series of triumphs for Irving C. Fine '37. It was he who with few rehearsals, whipped the Navy group into an organization which with a bit more practice and polish will become a well rounded, smoothly functioning unit. It was his work, the Incidental Music to Alice in Wonderland, with himself at the piano, which concluded the program. Recently revised for voices, it is charming, catchy music, written in a simple, direct, effective manner. If the applause of an enthusiastic audience has any positive correlation with the quality of the music, it can be regarded as a tremendous success. I hope that more will soon be forthcoming from so young and talented a musician.

Honegger's "King David" always brings up the question of whether it should be played by orchestra (scored for woodwinds, double bass, piano and harmonium), or as an oratorio. Both methods have been tried, the former at Mczieres in 1921, and the latter in Rome five years later. There were passages in it, as heard last night, which may have sounded somewhat strange, or out of place; but all in all, the combined groups did not disappoint the many people who have waited so long to hear it performed, and proved that it is as effective a piece of choral writing as it is an instrumental work.

It is to the credit of all concerned that, in the face of service-depleted ranks, and greater time demands on those remaining at school, the Glee Club has continued to pull through in such fine fashion. It is hoped that any further restrictions due to the present situation will in no way impair the twenty-one concert schedule so admirably begun last night.