Council Wants Consistency In Enforcing Parietal Rules

Possible Answers to Parking Problem Also Brought Up at Weekly Meeting Last Night

Parietal rules and parking appeared as two problems likely to meet with satisfactory solutions according to two of the reports submitted to the Student Council at its regular meeting last night.

Remodeling of the rules for women guests in the Houses by apparent concerted action of the various Housemasters coincided with a report by Harold C. Fleming '44 after two weeks of investigation, as Bronson W. Chanler '45 described as ready to go into operation several plans for eliminating the shortage of parking spaces.

Fleming's report, to be submitted to Dean Hanford today, observed that "irresponsibility by students is encouraged by lax enforcement" of House parietal rules, that offenders are known principally to belong to a "small, chronic group" and that lack of uniformity in regulations from House to House encourages violators in the less liberal ones.

Recommends Present Rules

Recommending that existing rules on the whole should not be changed, the report looked to more efficient enforcement within the Houses as the practical preventative, but decried known cases of "watchdog policing" as unnecessary and contrary to College policy.

Uniformity among the Houses appeared to be becoming a fact yesterday, but the suggestions backed by the Council called for an equalizing of times for the enter- tainment of women guests, for a uniform system of checking in and out, and for punishment in individual cases to be dealt out by proctors and Senior Tutors with only serious and chronic offenders to be dealt with by the Administrative Board of the College.

Parking Spaces Ready

As a last resort in the overnight auto parking problem, Vice President Reynolds has told the Council through Chanler that the University has lined up concessionaires to supervise proposed parking lots in back of the Stadium and on Western Avenue.

A questionnaire to be mailed this week to all resident students with requests for information on their vehicles, if any, will seek to sound out reaction to the over-the-river idea and to get definite statistics on the number of cars involved.

Difficulties pointed out in the Western Avenue and Stadium lots were 1) problems of snow-removal and flooding on the low land, 2) considerable walking distance from the College, and 3) dangers of possible vandalism since a 24-hour guard was considered impracticable for student supervisors.

Immediate solutions which were seen as possible "outs" for the whole crisis were the announcement of the opening of the vacant lot on the corner of Mill and DeWolfe streets, the possibility of using a few other nearby, similar lots, and the argument, not yet met with a formal counter, for allowing curb parking in and near the Eliot-Winthrop-Kirkland House area