Roads Clear, Ski Conditions Fair After Record Heat Spell

Harriman Favors Ivy College Union Of Key Societies

Bruce Harriman '50, president of the Crimson Key Society, last night announced his support of the proposed creation of an intercollegiate Key society designed to promote closer cooperation between Ivy colleges.

The plan, drawn up by Princeton's Orange Key and made public last week, has as its purpose "establishing good will among Ivy League colleges with respect to social activities and other joint extra-curricular endeavors."

Favor Idea

Although he was unwilling to predict whether the Crimson Key would vote to join the proposed group, Harriman said that it was an "excellent idea." He added, however, that he himself was strongly in favor and that it was likely that the Crimson Key would approve of the idea.

The Crimson Key, newest of the Ivy League Key societies, has had little contact with its counterparts in other colleges in the past, except just before football weekends. At that time the Crimson group offers information to incoming visitors.

In announcing its plan, the Orange Key said, "Efforts will be made to arrange a meeting where representatives from the various colleges will be able to talk over the proposal."

Except for a few slippery spots, conditions are good on roads running north and south from Cambridge, Massachusetts State Police reported last night. There have beer no jam-ups in spite of a five inch snowfall in the last two days, the first real snow of the winter.

Temperature records show that January of 1950 averaged an unusually warm 36.5 degrees, 8..6 degrees above normal temperature. Four days shattered all-time records, while January 26 broke the mark for any January day within record with a temperature of 71.5 degrees.

Fair Skiing

Skiing conditions throughout New England are fair to poor with only three resorts reporting good or excellent skiing. Bridgton, Maine, reports a total of 7 to 15 inches of snow with a four inch powder surface. Skiing, Bridgton claims, is good to excellent.

Jackson, New Hampshire, with a seven to 15 inch total and five inches of surface powder, reports that skiing is fair to good, while North Conway has a three to ten inch base with a five inch powder, and skiing there is also reported as fair to good. Snow conditions for Vermont are for the most part poor, although Woodstock reports good skiing on the upper and lower trials and conditions at Stowe are fair.

The Dartmouth Winter Carnival will he held as scheduled over the weekend, since Hanover received a six inch snow fall on Monday night. "Plenty of snow for the weekend," reports the Daily Dartmouth.

Amateurs Compete

Lake Placid was able to hold its jumping competition yesterday, which had been delayed due to lack of snow.

Chances for good skiing are likely to improve during the week, however, according to weather reports which forecast snow for tonight in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermong.