Shortage of Tubing Lessens Hockey Rink Chances in '52

Whether or not the H.A.A. could raise-enough money to build a hockey rink is pretty much an academic question, Thomas D. Bolles, director of Athletics, said yesterday. The H.A.A., even if it had money, couldn't get the necessary piping for lack of a government priority.

Rumors about a drive to pay for a rink started early this week when a Boston paper reported that an alumnus had offered $100,000 for such a project. Bolles said that he had no knowledge whatsoever of such a proposal.

Meanwhile John P. Chase 28, former Crimson hockey coach, said he knows many alumni, especially hockey families, who would support a campaign to finance a rink at once if it were officially planned and sponsored by the H.A.A.

But it would take nine miles of the hard to get pipe--one and a half inches in diameter to put together the freezing-point for a rink. The pipes would be had close together 185 feet in length and 90 feet across.

Endowment for Upkeep

High University officials have also indicated that they would not authorize construction of a rink until it received enough money to endow it for upkeep. The H.A.A. estimates it would cost $10,000 a year to keep a rink going.

Bolles said he was most anxious to have a rink as soon as it's feasible because the Boston Arena may fold, thus coffing off the College's main source of ice. Under such conditions, it is doubtful that the House hockey league could continue operating.

Chase estimated that an outdoor rink would cost only $85,000 and an indoor one $275,000. To cut down overhead, he said the University could share land and the use of a power plant offered by the Boston Skating Club.

Princeton, Dartmouth, and Brown have their own rinks, while Yale has almost unlimited access to the New Haven Arena.